This is one of those dishes which you just want to eat on its own. A simple thing such as browning the butter seems to transform the dish. Remember to dry the parsnips in the pan on a low heat; this removes the excess water and therefore concentrates the flavour. You can try the same method if you are making mashed potatoes and the potatoes have become a bit waterlogged.
If by some strange chance you have some of the mash left, let it go cold and, the next day, shape into little cakes. Shallow-fry them and serve with a fried egg.

SERVES 4
1kg parsnips, peeled and trimmed of their tops
80g unsalted butter
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper pinch of nutmeg
Slice the prepared parsnips into a saucepan, cover with water, bring to the boil, then simmer until soft when pierced with a knife.
Meanwhile, put the butter in a small frying pan over a medium heat. Hold at this temperature until you see the butter start to appear golden. It’s the milk solids which are actually browning and giving the colour and flavour. Once this has happened, remove from the heat and transfer to a little bowl to prevent it over-cooking.
When the parsnips are cooked, drain well, return them to the pan and put it over a low heat. Stir to prevent sticking and continue for around 4 minutes. You will see the steam drifting from the pan – that’s the water leaving.
Next mash the parsnips, season and add the nutmeg and brown butter. Mix well and serve.