Egg Hash

MAKES: 4 servings

TIME: 45 minutes

Usually eggs are served on hash. Here hard-cooked eggs are the hash. The secret is patience: To get the best browning and the least crumbling, you’ve got to let the potatoes and later the eggs do their thing in the pan, without too much stirring. A cast-iron pan really helps.

4 tablespoons (1/2 stick) butter or 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil, or a combination

2 or 3 large white potatoes, peeled if you like and cut into small dice

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

6 Hard-Cooked Eggs, peeled

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1/2 cup chopped scallion

1/4 cup minced parsley for garnish

Put 2 tablespoons of the butter and/or oil in a large skillet, preferably nonstick, over medium-high heat. When the butter is melted or the oil is hot, add the potatoes, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and cook undisturbed, until the edges brown and they release easily from the pan, about 5 minutes. Toss the potatoes gently, scraping up any bits from the bottom of the pan, and turn the heat down to medium. Cook, stirring occasionally, until they are crisp and golden on all sides and tender inside, about 10 to 15 minutes more. Add a spoonful or two of water to the pan and stir to remove any browned bits. Transfer them to a plate.

Cut the eggs in half. Put the yolks in a small bowl and mash them lightly with a fork. Chop the whites into large pieces.

Put the remaining butter or oil in the pan and turn the heat back up to medium-high. When the butter is melted or the oil is hot, add the egg whites and cook undisturbed until they start to sizzle and crisp, about 3 minutes. Then sprinkle them with salt and pepper and toss them gently, scraping up any bits from the bottom of the pan. Turn the heat down to medium again and add the garlic. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the garlic is soft and the eggs are golden all over, another 2 or 3 minutes.

Return the potatoes to the pan along with the scallions and toss to combine. Turn the heat down to medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until the hash is piping hot, 3 minutes or so. Gently stir in the egg yolks. Taste, adjust the seasoning, and serve immediately, sprinkled with parsley.

Variations

Egg Hash with Curry and Coconut Milk. A little creamier: Omit the parsley and mince 1/2 cup of cilantro instead. Chop 1/4 cup pistachios if you like. In Step 3 when you add the garlic, also stir in 2 tablespoons Hot or Fragrant Curry Powder. In Step 4, stir in 1/2 cup coconut milk and cook for another couple of minutes to heat through. Proceed with the recipe. Garnish with cilantro and pistachios. Serve with lime wedges.

Egg Hash with Celery and Pickles. Sort of like a warm potato salad: in Step 4, when you add the egg yolks, stir in 1/2 cup minced celery, 1/4 cup minced sweet or dill pickles, and 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard. Proceed with the recipe.

Chipotle Egg Hash. Hot and smoky: Omit the parsley and mince 1/2 cup of cilantro instead. In Step 4, when you add the egg yolks, stir in 2 or 3 (or to taste) chopped canned chipotle chiles and a spoonful of their adobo. Proceed with the recipe. Garnish with cilantro and serve with a dollop of sour cream if you like.

Egg Hash with Rice. A great quick supper, especially if you have leftover rice: Omit the potatoes. In Step 1, start the hash by cooking 3 to 4 cups cooked longgrain white or brown rice in the butter and/or oil. Stir the rice only when it starts to brown. Instead of taking 15 minutes, the rice will be golden in 5 to 8. Transfer to a plate and proceed with the recipe.